Men have become the tools of their tools.

Henry David Thoreau. US Transcendentalist author (1817 - 1862) - The Quotations Page. (via darksilenceinsuburbia)

(via wildcat2030)

To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all.

— Oscar Wilde   (via nofatnowhip)

(via nofatnowhip)

Easter was not a down-count…it was a Countdown.

siosidesignandbuild:

Drawer details #kitchenisland #drawers #design #moderndesign #furnituredesign #splines #woodshop #woodworking #dowels

(via nanouchkapod)

Source: siosidesignandbuild

(via thomortiz)

Source: princeslav

The tongue, the Chinese say,
is like a sharp knife:
it kills
without drawing blood.

— Anne Sexton, The Dead Heart (via stxxz)

(via stxxz)

outofprintclothing:

R.I.P. Gabriel García Márquez

(via bobbycaputo)

Source: outofprintclothing

bobbycaputo:

Epic Photos Expose Mankind’s Uneasy Relationship With Water
Edward Burtynsky’s work can be seen as a 30-year-long meditation on the prime forces that shape our modern world. Through projects like Oil, Quarries, and Manufactured Landscapes, he’s developed a singular approach to presenting stop-you-in-your-tracks images of the staggering impact of human activity.
Burtynsky and his team are true to form in Water, a jaw-dropping survey in photos and film of the most essential substance to life on Earth.
“There are alternatives to oil,” he says. “There’s electricity in solar and wind, and electric cars. We can begin to do workarounds, albeit not rapidly, but over time we can work around and find alternative energy. But there is no alternative to water. It’s either there or it’s not.”
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Epic Photos Expose Mankind’s Uneasy Relationship With Water
Edward Burtynsky’s work can be seen as a 30-year-long meditation on the prime forces that shape our modern world. Through projects like Oil, Quarries, and Manufactured Landscapes, he’s developed a singular approach to presenting stop-you-in-your-tracks images of the staggering impact of human activity.
Burtynsky and his team are true to form in Water, a jaw-dropping survey in photos and film of the most essential substance to life on Earth.
“There are alternatives to oil,” he says. “There’s electricity in solar and wind, and electric cars. We can begin to do workarounds, albeit not rapidly, but over time we can work around and find alternative energy. But there is no alternative to water. It’s either there or it’s not.”
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Epic Photos Expose Mankind’s Uneasy Relationship With Water
Edward Burtynsky’s work can be seen as a 30-year-long meditation on the prime forces that shape our modern world. Through projects like Oil, Quarries, and Manufactured Landscapes, he’s developed a singular approach to presenting stop-you-in-your-tracks images of the staggering impact of human activity.
Burtynsky and his team are true to form in Water, a jaw-dropping survey in photos and film of the most essential substance to life on Earth.
“There are alternatives to oil,” he says. “There’s electricity in solar and wind, and electric cars. We can begin to do workarounds, albeit not rapidly, but over time we can work around and find alternative energy. But there is no alternative to water. It’s either there or it’s not.”
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Epic Photos Expose Mankind’s Uneasy Relationship With Water
Edward Burtynsky’s work can be seen as a 30-year-long meditation on the prime forces that shape our modern world. Through projects like Oil, Quarries, and Manufactured Landscapes, he’s developed a singular approach to presenting stop-you-in-your-tracks images of the staggering impact of human activity.
Burtynsky and his team are true to form in Water, a jaw-dropping survey in photos and film of the most essential substance to life on Earth.
“There are alternatives to oil,” he says. “There’s electricity in solar and wind, and electric cars. We can begin to do workarounds, albeit not rapidly, but over time we can work around and find alternative energy. But there is no alternative to water. It’s either there or it’s not.”
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Epic Photos Expose Mankind’s Uneasy Relationship With Water
Edward Burtynsky’s work can be seen as a 30-year-long meditation on the prime forces that shape our modern world. Through projects like Oil, Quarries, and Manufactured Landscapes, he’s developed a singular approach to presenting stop-you-in-your-tracks images of the staggering impact of human activity.
Burtynsky and his team are true to form in Water, a jaw-dropping survey in photos and film of the most essential substance to life on Earth.
“There are alternatives to oil,” he says. “There’s electricity in solar and wind, and electric cars. We can begin to do workarounds, albeit not rapidly, but over time we can work around and find alternative energy. But there is no alternative to water. It’s either there or it’s not.”
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Epic Photos Expose Mankind’s Uneasy Relationship With Water
Edward Burtynsky’s work can be seen as a 30-year-long meditation on the prime forces that shape our modern world. Through projects like Oil, Quarries, and Manufactured Landscapes, he’s developed a singular approach to presenting stop-you-in-your-tracks images of the staggering impact of human activity.
Burtynsky and his team are true to form in Water, a jaw-dropping survey in photos and film of the most essential substance to life on Earth.
“There are alternatives to oil,” he says. “There’s electricity in solar and wind, and electric cars. We can begin to do workarounds, albeit not rapidly, but over time we can work around and find alternative energy. But there is no alternative to water. It’s either there or it’s not.”
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Epic Photos Expose Mankind’s Uneasy Relationship With Water
Edward Burtynsky’s work can be seen as a 30-year-long meditation on the prime forces that shape our modern world. Through projects like Oil, Quarries, and Manufactured Landscapes, he’s developed a singular approach to presenting stop-you-in-your-tracks images of the staggering impact of human activity.
Burtynsky and his team are true to form in Water, a jaw-dropping survey in photos and film of the most essential substance to life on Earth.
“There are alternatives to oil,” he says. “There’s electricity in solar and wind, and electric cars. We can begin to do workarounds, albeit not rapidly, but over time we can work around and find alternative energy. But there is no alternative to water. It’s either there or it’s not.”
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Epic Photos Expose Mankind’s Uneasy Relationship With Water
Edward Burtynsky’s work can be seen as a 30-year-long meditation on the prime forces that shape our modern world. Through projects like Oil, Quarries, and Manufactured Landscapes, he’s developed a singular approach to presenting stop-you-in-your-tracks images of the staggering impact of human activity.
Burtynsky and his team are true to form in Water, a jaw-dropping survey in photos and film of the most essential substance to life on Earth.
“There are alternatives to oil,” he says. “There’s electricity in solar and wind, and electric cars. We can begin to do workarounds, albeit not rapidly, but over time we can work around and find alternative energy. But there is no alternative to water. It’s either there or it’s not.”
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Epic Photos Expose Mankind’s Uneasy Relationship With Water
Edward Burtynsky’s work can be seen as a 30-year-long meditation on the prime forces that shape our modern world. Through projects like Oil, Quarries, and Manufactured Landscapes, he’s developed a singular approach to presenting stop-you-in-your-tracks images of the staggering impact of human activity.
Burtynsky and his team are true to form in Water, a jaw-dropping survey in photos and film of the most essential substance to life on Earth.
“There are alternatives to oil,” he says. “There’s electricity in solar and wind, and electric cars. We can begin to do workarounds, albeit not rapidly, but over time we can work around and find alternative energy. But there is no alternative to water. It’s either there or it’s not.”
(Continue Reading)

bobbycaputo:

Epic Photos Expose Mankind’s Uneasy Relationship With Water

Edward Burtynsky’s work can be seen as a 30-year-long meditation on the prime forces that shape our modern world. Through projects like Oil, Quarries, and Manufactured Landscapes, he’s developed a singular approach to presenting stop-you-in-your-tracks images of the staggering impact of human activity.

Burtynsky and his team are true to form in Water, a jaw-dropping survey in photos and film of the most essential substance to life on Earth.

“There are alternatives to oil,” he says. “There’s electricity in solar and wind, and electric cars. We can begin to do workarounds, albeit not rapidly, but over time we can work around and find alternative energy. But there is no alternative to water. It’s either there or it’s not.”

(Continue Reading)

Source: bobbycaputo

(via wayofthesamvrai)

Source: kevc

bobbycaputo:

coopersgirl68:

kateoplis:

Say Anything is 25 years old, as are all the unfulfilled hopes and aspirations of your youth, including but not limited to the dream you had of making a difference in the lives of people other than your friends and family and the vague ideas that at some point in your life the work you would be doing would have meaning in and of itself and not merely be the thing you dragged yourself into each morning because you became a prisoner to status and possessions and the ever-increasing series of compromises and “temporary” positions you took with the delusion that you would only do those things until you got yourself to a place where you were able to follow your bliss, and now when you look back on that idealistic kid from 1989 you are stricken with a mixture of disgust for the ignorance of youth and sadness about the hard realities of life. But of course this is only true for people of a certain age; if you are much younger, don’t worry, I’m sure everything will work out exactly the way you expect it to.

Movie Old

Truth.

Well shit

Source: kateoplis

bobbycaputo:

America’s Black Basketball Pioneers

Long before the National Basketball Association became racially integrated in 1950, black players had been charting their own course in basketball. The New-York Historical Society’s exhibition “The Black Fives” tells that nearly 50-year history in photographs, objects, and other memorabilia. Taken together, it celebrates the pioneering teams (known as “fives” for their five starting players) and athletes who shaped the early days of the game and paved the way for progress in other areas of black life.


According to the Black Fives Foundation, a not-for-profit that collaborated on the exhibit and works to promote the history of this era of black basketball, blacks have been playing the game since high school teacher Edwin Bancroft Henderson introduced it to his students in 1904. In 1906, the Smart Set Athletic Club of Brooklyn, N.Y., became the first independent black basketball team in the country. Others followed, including the Alpha Physical Culture Club, the nation’s first all-black athletic club, and the New York Girls, the first all-black female team. Later, the New York Renaissance Big Five, also known as the “New York Rens,” became the first black-owned professional basketball team and went on to win the first World Championship of Professional Basketball in 1939.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

America’s Black Basketball Pioneers

Long before the National Basketball Association became racially integrated in 1950, black players had been charting their own course in basketball. The New-York Historical Society’s exhibition “The Black Fives” tells that nearly 50-year history in photographs, objects, and other memorabilia. Taken together, it celebrates the pioneering teams (known as “fives” for their five starting players) and athletes who shaped the early days of the game and paved the way for progress in other areas of black life.


According to the Black Fives Foundation, a not-for-profit that collaborated on the exhibit and works to promote the history of this era of black basketball, blacks have been playing the game since high school teacher Edwin Bancroft Henderson introduced it to his students in 1904. In 1906, the Smart Set Athletic Club of Brooklyn, N.Y., became the first independent black basketball team in the country. Others followed, including the Alpha Physical Culture Club, the nation’s first all-black athletic club, and the New York Girls, the first all-black female team. Later, the New York Renaissance Big Five, also known as the “New York Rens,” became the first black-owned professional basketball team and went on to win the first World Championship of Professional Basketball in 1939.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

America’s Black Basketball Pioneers

Long before the National Basketball Association became racially integrated in 1950, black players had been charting their own course in basketball. The New-York Historical Society’s exhibition “The Black Fives” tells that nearly 50-year history in photographs, objects, and other memorabilia. Taken together, it celebrates the pioneering teams (known as “fives” for their five starting players) and athletes who shaped the early days of the game and paved the way for progress in other areas of black life.


According to the Black Fives Foundation, a not-for-profit that collaborated on the exhibit and works to promote the history of this era of black basketball, blacks have been playing the game since high school teacher Edwin Bancroft Henderson introduced it to his students in 1904. In 1906, the Smart Set Athletic Club of Brooklyn, N.Y., became the first independent black basketball team in the country. Others followed, including the Alpha Physical Culture Club, the nation’s first all-black athletic club, and the New York Girls, the first all-black female team. Later, the New York Renaissance Big Five, also known as the “New York Rens,” became the first black-owned professional basketball team and went on to win the first World Championship of Professional Basketball in 1939.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

America’s Black Basketball Pioneers

Long before the National Basketball Association became racially integrated in 1950, black players had been charting their own course in basketball. The New-York Historical Society’s exhibition “The Black Fives” tells that nearly 50-year history in photographs, objects, and other memorabilia. Taken together, it celebrates the pioneering teams (known as “fives” for their five starting players) and athletes who shaped the early days of the game and paved the way for progress in other areas of black life.


According to the Black Fives Foundation, a not-for-profit that collaborated on the exhibit and works to promote the history of this era of black basketball, blacks have been playing the game since high school teacher Edwin Bancroft Henderson introduced it to his students in 1904. In 1906, the Smart Set Athletic Club of Brooklyn, N.Y., became the first independent black basketball team in the country. Others followed, including the Alpha Physical Culture Club, the nation’s first all-black athletic club, and the New York Girls, the first all-black female team. Later, the New York Renaissance Big Five, also known as the “New York Rens,” became the first black-owned professional basketball team and went on to win the first World Championship of Professional Basketball in 1939.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

America’s Black Basketball Pioneers

Long before the National Basketball Association became racially integrated in 1950, black players had been charting their own course in basketball. The New-York Historical Society’s exhibition “The Black Fives” tells that nearly 50-year history in photographs, objects, and other memorabilia. Taken together, it celebrates the pioneering teams (known as “fives” for their five starting players) and athletes who shaped the early days of the game and paved the way for progress in other areas of black life.


According to the Black Fives Foundation, a not-for-profit that collaborated on the exhibit and works to promote the history of this era of black basketball, blacks have been playing the game since high school teacher Edwin Bancroft Henderson introduced it to his students in 1904. In 1906, the Smart Set Athletic Club of Brooklyn, N.Y., became the first independent black basketball team in the country. Others followed, including the Alpha Physical Culture Club, the nation’s first all-black athletic club, and the New York Girls, the first all-black female team. Later, the New York Renaissance Big Five, also known as the “New York Rens,” became the first black-owned professional basketball team and went on to win the first World Championship of Professional Basketball in 1939.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

America’s Black Basketball Pioneers

Long before the National Basketball Association became racially integrated in 1950, black players had been charting their own course in basketball. The New-York Historical Society’s exhibition “The Black Fives” tells that nearly 50-year history in photographs, objects, and other memorabilia. Taken together, it celebrates the pioneering teams (known as “fives” for their five starting players) and athletes who shaped the early days of the game and paved the way for progress in other areas of black life.


According to the Black Fives Foundation, a not-for-profit that collaborated on the exhibit and works to promote the history of this era of black basketball, blacks have been playing the game since high school teacher Edwin Bancroft Henderson introduced it to his students in 1904. In 1906, the Smart Set Athletic Club of Brooklyn, N.Y., became the first independent black basketball team in the country. Others followed, including the Alpha Physical Culture Club, the nation’s first all-black athletic club, and the New York Girls, the first all-black female team. Later, the New York Renaissance Big Five, also known as the “New York Rens,” became the first black-owned professional basketball team and went on to win the first World Championship of Professional Basketball in 1939.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

America’s Black Basketball Pioneers

Long before the National Basketball Association became racially integrated in 1950, black players had been charting their own course in basketball. The New-York Historical Society’s exhibition “The Black Fives” tells that nearly 50-year history in photographs, objects, and other memorabilia. Taken together, it celebrates the pioneering teams (known as “fives” for their five starting players) and athletes who shaped the early days of the game and paved the way for progress in other areas of black life.


According to the Black Fives Foundation, a not-for-profit that collaborated on the exhibit and works to promote the history of this era of black basketball, blacks have been playing the game since high school teacher Edwin Bancroft Henderson introduced it to his students in 1904. In 1906, the Smart Set Athletic Club of Brooklyn, N.Y., became the first independent black basketball team in the country. Others followed, including the Alpha Physical Culture Club, the nation’s first all-black athletic club, and the New York Girls, the first all-black female team. Later, the New York Renaissance Big Five, also known as the “New York Rens,” became the first black-owned professional basketball team and went on to win the first World Championship of Professional Basketball in 1939.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

America’s Black Basketball Pioneers

Long before the National Basketball Association became racially integrated in 1950, black players had been charting their own course in basketball. The New-York Historical Society’s exhibition “The Black Fives” tells that nearly 50-year history in photographs, objects, and other memorabilia. Taken together, it celebrates the pioneering teams (known as “fives” for their five starting players) and athletes who shaped the early days of the game and paved the way for progress in other areas of black life.


According to the Black Fives Foundation, a not-for-profit that collaborated on the exhibit and works to promote the history of this era of black basketball, blacks have been playing the game since high school teacher Edwin Bancroft Henderson introduced it to his students in 1904. In 1906, the Smart Set Athletic Club of Brooklyn, N.Y., became the first independent black basketball team in the country. Others followed, including the Alpha Physical Culture Club, the nation’s first all-black athletic club, and the New York Girls, the first all-black female team. Later, the New York Renaissance Big Five, also known as the “New York Rens,” became the first black-owned professional basketball team and went on to win the first World Championship of Professional Basketball in 1939.
(Continue Reading)

bobbycaputo:

America’s Black Basketball Pioneers

Long before the National Basketball Association became racially integrated in 1950, black players had been charting their own course in basketball. The New-York Historical Society’s exhibition “The Black Fives” tells that nearly 50-year history in photographs, objects, and other memorabilia. Taken together, it celebrates the pioneering teams (known as “fives” for their five starting players) and athletes who shaped the early days of the game and paved the way for progress in other areas of black life.

According to the Black Fives Foundation, a not-for-profit that collaborated on the exhibit and works to promote the history of this era of black basketball, blacks have been playing the game since high school teacher Edwin Bancroft Henderson introduced it to his students in 1904. In 1906, the Smart Set Athletic Club of Brooklyn, N.Y., became the first independent black basketball team in the country. Others followed, including the Alpha Physical Culture Club, the nation’s first all-black athletic club, and the New York Girls, the first all-black female team. Later, the New York Renaissance Big Five, also known as the “New York Rens,” became the first black-owned professional basketball team and went on to win the first World Championship of Professional Basketball in 1939.

(Continue Reading)

Source: bobbycaputo

midcenturymodernfreak:

Retro Future
1968 Nordmende “Spectra Futura" Desktop Radio | Design: Raymond Loewy | Available in different color combinations! - Via: 1 | 2
midcenturymodernfreak:

Retro Future
1968 Nordmende “Spectra Futura" Desktop Radio | Design: Raymond Loewy | Available in different color combinations! - Via: 1 | 2

midcenturymodernfreak:

Retro Future

1968 Nordmende “Spectra Futura" Desktop Radio | Design: Raymond Loewy | Available in different color combinations! - Via: 1 | 2

(via whatisindustrialdesign)

Source: midcenturymodernfreak